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We have a holistic approach towards the treatment of animals in our care.

We look at the whole animal for example its diet, husbandry, environment and not just its presenting symptoms.

The majority of problems are caused by incorrect  diet & husbandry.

At Currumbin Valley Veterinary Surgery we place a great emphasis on the education of our clients to make them more aware of the special needs and requirements of their pets.

Just letting our face book followers know that due to high winds we have power outages - functioning with a generator - phones have also been unreliable - sometimes dropping out as a result of strong winds - so if ...
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Baby Boo the Budgie saying “thanks for the Cheerio mum. I’m having a great time!”
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 2 new photos.
Django, having a holiday and saying “Hello “ to our resident macaws, Buster and B.B. Double wire panels separate aviary sections so no toes get bitten.
Little Chippy, the love bird, fractured his leg when it was caught in a door- he has a cast applied to stabilise the break and an Elizabethan collar to stop him chewing his cast. A properly set up cage is ...
Puff, the duck, having some hydro therapy to help with her recovery
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Delta is a handsome gander with some wing problems. Unfortunately he had a pre-existing condition called “angel wing”. This condition is common in young waterfowl that eat a high protein diet. Unnaturally rapid growth of the flight feather places excess ...
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Guinea pig urine tends to be thick and sludgie with a high mineral content. They are prone to developing bladder stones. This tendency to develop bladder stones can be exacerbated by diets that are high in calcium (alfalfa and calcium ...
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Little Chance, the Blue and Gold Macaw, who inadvertently swallowed her feeding tube , five weeks post surgery- looking good and growing up nicely
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 2 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Short feeding tubes are commonly used for hand-raising parrots. However, there is a danger that these short tubes come loose from the feeding syringe when the baby bird pumps vigorously whilst feeding. When this occurs, the tube is swallowed and ...
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post In avian practice, we regularly treat many birds suffering from obesity and associated problems. One of the main causes of obesity in pet birds is diets that are too high in fat and deficient in essential vitamins and minerals. Obese ...
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Many birds are presented to our practice with too short, “hacked off”wing trims which are a common cause of trauma in pet birds. They crash land on wood or tiled floors and split the skin over the breast bone. When ...
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post All Australian dry, inland birds love to forage on fresh grass seed. See our website www.currumbinvetservices.com.au and read our article “wild food for your birds “ - unfortunately during winter there’s not a lot of grass available- however we can ...

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Just letting our face book followers know that due to high winds we have power outages - functioning with a generator - phones have also been unreliable - sometimes dropping out as a result of strong winds - so if you have had trouble contacting us be patient- thank you
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Baby Boo the Budgie saying “thanks for the Cheerio mum. I’m having a great time!”
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 2 new photos.
Django, having a holiday and saying “Hello “ to our resident macaws, Buster and B.B. Double wire panels separate aviary sections so no toes get bitten.
Little Chippy, the love bird, fractured his leg when it was caught in a door- he has a cast applied to stabilise the break and an Elizabethan collar to stop him chewing his cast. A properly set up cage is a safe place for a bird - unsupervised time in the house is dangerous- check out our website www.currumbinvetservices.com.au and read our article about “Household Dangers for pet parrots “ and “Cages for pet birds “
Puff, the duck, having some hydro therapy to help with her recovery
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Delta is a handsome gander with some wing problems. Unfortunately he had a pre-existing condition called “angel wing”. This condition is common in young waterfowl that eat a high protein diet. Unnaturally rapid growth of the flight feather places excess stress on the muscles and tendons of the growing wing tip and causes the wing tip to rotate outwards. However, his problems were compounded by a fracture of his humerus near his shoulder joint.The wing was already totally non-functional and cumbersome so there was no point in trying to repair the fracture. Amputation was the best outcome for this patient.
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 3 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Guinea pig urine tends to be thick and sludgie with a high mineral content. They are prone to developing bladder stones. This tendency to develop bladder stones can be exacerbated by diets that are high in calcium (alfalfa and calcium rich greens). There can also be a genetic component involved in the development of bladder stones. Little Precious developed a painful bladder stone in her urethra. While Precious was anaesthetised, Dr Peter was able to remove the stone.
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 5 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Little Chance, the Blue and Gold Macaw, who inadvertently swallowed her feeding tube , five weeks post surgery- looking good and growing up nicely
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 2 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Short feeding tubes are commonly used for hand-raising parrots. However, there is a danger that these short tubes come loose from the feeding syringe when the baby bird pumps vigorously whilst feeding. When this occurs, the tube is swallowed and can end up in the baby’s stomach. Avian vets often have to surgically remove the tube in these cases. This is what happened to Chance, a five week old Blue and Gold Macaw.
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 7 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post In avian practice, we regularly treat many birds suffering from obesity and associated problems. One of the main causes of obesity in pet birds is diets that are too high in fat and deficient in essential vitamins and minerals. Obese galahs are often presented with benign, fatty lumps (lipomas) around their abdomen and vent. In the majority of these cases changes to diet and lifestyle will reduce the size of the lump and reduce or eliminate the need for major surgery. Billy, the galah, dieted for 2 months and then had surgery to remove the greatly reduced lipoma.
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 4 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post Many birds are presented to our practice with too short, “hacked off”wing trims which are a common cause of trauma in pet birds. They crash land on wood or tiled floors and split the skin over the breast bone. When new, delicate, blood feathers grow, they are unprotected by older, stiffer feathers and they get knocked, broken and bleed. It is common practice in avian Vet surgeries to do feather extensions or imping on bird’s wings that are cut too short and this corrects problems caused by inappropriate wing trims. The following photos show Dr. Peter doing imping on Lemon, a sweet Indian Ringneck.
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 6 new photos.
Photos from Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet's post All Australian dry, inland birds love to forage on fresh grass seed. See our website www.currumbinvetservices.com.au and read our article “wild food for your birds “ - unfortunately during winter there’s not a lot of grass available- however we can still find some crows foot - beggars can’t be choosers
Currumbin Valley Birds, Reptiles & Exotics Vet added 2 new photos.

©2018 Currumbin Valley Birds & Exotics Vet

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